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Did you know that Portland, OR is a fantastic hub for snow sports? With the nearby Mt. Hood ski areas and its proximity to the Cascades, Portland is a prime spot for people who love skiing and snowboarding. If you’re looking to ski/ride for the first time, sharpen your skills, or tackle adrenaline-inducing drops, there are ski resorts near Portland for you. Curious about where you should go? Here’s our guide to the best places for snowboarding and skiing near Portland, OR.

Best Places for Snowboarding and Skiing Near Portland, OR

Summit Ski Area

  • Distance from Portland: 57 miles (~1 hour, 15 minutes)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site, but nearby lodging available at Timberline Lodge
  • Ability Level: All levels, mostly beginner and intermediate

Located just over an hour outside of the city, Summit Ski Area is a fantastic place for snowboarding and skiing near Portland if you’re on a time crunch. Owned by Timberline Ski, this family-friendly resort caters largely to locals who want beginner and intermediate-level slopes.

It’s one of the many Mt. Hood ski resorts, but it’s typically less crowded and more relaxed than some of the more intense resorts. For beginners and first-time skiers, Summit Ski Area is the perfect choice, as it’s affordable and offers plenty of variety for less experienced skiers.

Fun fact: Summit Ski Area was built in 1927 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ski areas in the country!

How to Get There: If driving, start on Pacific Hwy W, then follow signs for U.S. 30 E/Interstate 84 E/The Dalles. Continue straight onto US-26 E, then look for Government Camp Loop (village at base mountain). If not driving, there are multiple trains a day that leave from Union Station.

Timberline Ski Area

  • Distance from Portland: 62 miles (~1 hour, 15 minutes)
  • Accommodations Available: Yes, at Timberline Lodge
  • Ability Level: All levels

It might seem hard to believe, but Timberline Ski Area is open year-round for skiing. Yup, that means 12 months out of the year, it’s available for courageous skiers and snowboarders to visit. Located near the top of an 11,245 foot volcano, Timberline has the unique advantage of being on the side of the tallest mountain in Oregon.

The 41 trails here are fairly evenly split between easy, moderate, and difficult ratings, with plenty of resources for beginners and first-timers. Interestingly enough, this mountain was developed as part of the New Deal, and a lot of people flock here to learn about the history of this National Historic Landmark.

Some of the most highly recommended runs are Upper and Lower Salamander, Upper Dew Drop, and Lower Almost Heaven, as well as skiing on Palmer Glacier.

How to Get There: If driving, start on Pacific Hwy W, then follow signs for U.S. 30 E/Interstate 84 E/The Dalles, Continue straight onto US-26 E, then turn onto Timberline Highway to resort. If not driving, there are shuttles that take you directly to Timberline lodge, or trains leaving from Union Station.

Mt. Hood Skibowl

  • Distance from Portland: 55 miles (~1 hour, 15 minutes)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site
  • Ability Level: All levels

For more extreme skiers and snowboarders, Mt. Hood Skibowl is one of the best ski resorts near Portland, OR. With 69 trails spanning beginner to expert level, you can opt to tackle the resort’s longest trail, the Skyline Trail, which spans 3 miles! For advanced and expert-level skiers, Mt. Hood Skibowl has the most black diamond runs in Oregon, and they also boast fantastic night skiing opportunities (the largest in North America!) for those wanting to extend the ski day. For non-skiers and riders, there’s also a winter adventure park with snow tubing, sleigh rides, and more available at the park.

As it’s right off of Highway 26, Mt. Hood Skibowl is one of the more accessible resorts on Mt. Hood, so it’s perfect if you want to do a short trip from the city. While it’s a pretty no-frills, simple resort, the trails here are definitely worth a trip!

How to Get There: If driving, start on Pacific Hwy W, then follow signs for U.S. 30 E/Interstate 84 E/The Dalles, Continue straight onto US-26 E, then look for Government Camp Loop (village at base mountain. If not driving, there are multiple trains a day that leave from Union Station.

Mt. Hood Meadows

  • Distance from Portland: 67 miles (~1.5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site
  • Ability Level: All levels

Another spectacular place to go skiing and snowboarding near Portlant is Mount Hood Meadows, which operates in the Mount Hood National Forest. The resort’s 87 trails are largely intermediate and advanced level, so we’d recommend having plenty of experience under your belt before choosing to tackle this resort.

The highest elevation at the resort is 7,300 feet, so many of the runs are fairly advanced and are definitely not for the faint of heart. More experienced skiers can head to Heather and Clark Canyons for a more back-country trail experience with a variety of terrain.

How to Get There: If driving, start on Pacific Hwy W, then follow signs for U.S. 30 E/Interstate 84 E/The Dalles, Continue straight onto US-26 E, Take the exit toward Ski Resort/Bennet Pass/Soo Park/Mt Hood Meadows. If not driving, there are shuttles from Portland that take you directly to the Meadows Lodge.

Teacup Lake (Nordic)

  • Distance from Portland: 67 miles (~1.5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site
  • Ability Level: All levels

For avid Nordic/cross-country skiers, Teacup Lake is a fantastic place to go cross-country skiing near Portland! At 1.5 hours from the city, it’s easy to get to on a day trip, or for a weekend getaway. Teacup Lake is run by a non-profit and provides access to 12+ miles of trails, with Nordic lessons and a 4.5 loop trail available depending on your skill level. The outer trails are more appropriate for experienced Nordic skiers, with challenging hills and forested trails.

Pro tip: Rental equipment is NOT available here, so be sure to bring your own gear or rent at a ski/snowboard shop in Portland before you leave.

How to Get There: If driving, start on Pacific Hwy W, then follow signs for U.S. 30 E/Interstate 84 E/The Dalles. Take the State Route 35 N exit toward Hood River, continue on OR-35 to the lakes. If not driving, Oregon Nordic Club provides an a bus from Portland to Teacup lake ($23).

Cooper Spur Mountain Resort

  • Distance from Portland: 90 miles (~1 hour, 40 minutes)
  • Accommodations Available: Yes, at Cooper Spur Mountain Resort
  • Ability Level: All levels, mostly beginner and intermediate

On the north side of Mt. Hood lies Cooper Spur Mountain Resort, which is a smaller resort that has just 50 acres of beginner and intermediate trails. The resort offers skiing, snowboarding, tubing, cross-country, and snowshoeing, making it a fantastic option for families or groups that have non-skiers and riders.

If you book a stay at the Cooper Spur Mountain Resort, you can get discounted lift tickets for a perfect winter weekend getaway. Visitors refer to Cooper Spur as a “hidden gem,” as it’s less crowded than Timberline or Mount Hood Skibowl.

How to Get There: If driving, start on Pacific Hwy W, then follow signs for U.S. 30 E/Interstate 84 E/The Dalles. Turn right onto Button Bridge Rd/Mt Hood Hwy (signs for OR-35 S/Govt. Camp) and continue on Cooper Spur Rd. If not driving, Mt. Hood charters a bus to and from the Portland Metro Area, and you can purchase tickets online.

Hoodoo Ski Area

  • Distance from Portland: 132 miles (~2 hours, 15 minutes)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site
  • Ability Level: All levels

Moving away from the Mt. Hood area, you’ll find one of the locals’ favorite ski resorts – Hoodoo Ski Area. Cited by visitors as a “more affordable version of Whistler,” the park offers over 800 acres of skiable terrain and 34 runs, as well as one of the largest tubing parks on the West Coast. Located in Willamette National Forest, the resort itself sits on a volcanic cone area called Hoodoo Butte.

The front side is much better for beginners and less experienced riders and skiers, while advanced practitioners should find something that suits their fancy on the back side. Wide open trails and spacious runs are what visitors love the most about the slopes here, plus an affordable price tag compared to other ski resorts near Portland (come on Thursdays for the special “Thrifty Thursday deals!).

How to Get There: The best way to get to Hoodoo Ski Area is by car. If you are driving, start on I-5 S, Take exit 253 for OR-22 E toward Detroit Lake/Bend. US-20 E to Big Lake Road (Sister, OR).

Willamette Pass

  • Distance from Portland: 173 miles (~2 hours, 45 minutes)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site
  • Ability Level: All levels

Willamette Pass is a locally owned ski area that has 555 acres of skiable terrain. At under 3 hours from Portland, OR, it’s accessible as a weekend escape or a long day trip. Here, there is a broad mixture of difficulty levels on the trails, from bunny hills to steep, challenging runs.

A less crowded option than Mt. Hood Meadows or Mt. Bachelor, many locals enjoy coming here for the local, community-oriented feel. The panoramic views from the top and wooded trails are some of the aspects of Willamette Pass that visitors to the resort love the most.

How to Get There: If driving, start on I-5 S, take exit 188 for OR-58 toward Oakridge/Klamath Falls, then resort is right off of Highway 58. If not driving, the buses and trains go to Eugene, OR, and then there are free shuttles to the mountain.

Mount Bachelor

  • Distance from Portland: 181 miles (~3.5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Yes, at Mount Bachelor Village Resort
  • Ability Level: All levels, mostly intermediate and advanced

While it’s not exactly the closest of the ski resorts near Portland, Mount Bachelor is an excellent option for a weekend getaway, especially for experienced skiers. Founded in 1958, Mount Bachelor is now one of the largest ski resorts in the US. Located in Deschutes National Forest in Oregon’s Cascades, the Mount Bachelor boasts stunning views of several surrounding mountain peaks. It’s also the highest elevation ski area in Oregon and Washington!

For skiing and riding, the snow here is powdery and dry, with great conditions throughout the season. The resort’s 101 trails feature a whopping 50% of black diamond and double black diamond routes, and another 35% of intermediate runs.

Pro tip: If you can, go on weekdays to avoid the crowds – this is one of the most popular options on our list, and it can get quite crowded on weekends and holidays.

How to Get There: If driving, start on I-5 S, Take exit 253 for OR-22 E toward Detroit Lake/Bend. Take exit 138 toward Downtown/Mt Bachelor. If not driving, Mt. Bachelor partners with Deschutes Pub to have a bus directly to the mountain, included dinner and beer (must be 21). Otherwise, buses and trains connect through Eugene, OR and you can take a shuttle from there.

Crystal Mountain Resort

  • Distance from Portland: 204 miles (~3.5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Yes, at Crystal Mountain Chalets
  • Ability Level: All levels

At 3.5 hours from the city, Crystal Mountain Resort is one of the top places to go for a weekend getaway of snowboarding and skiing near Portland, OR. Given its beautiful location spanning two peaks, the resort became famous after hosting the 1955 National Alpine Ski Championship. With 58 trails ranging from beginner to advanced levels, you can definitely test your skills here. Crystal Mountain Resort has great offers, like discounts during the month of January, family Sundays, and more.

Not planning on skiing? No problem! Crystal Mountain also has plenty of non-slope activities, like snowmobiling, ice skating, and snow biking.

How to Get There: The easiest way to get there is by car. If driving, start on I-405 N, take the Interstate 5 N exit toward Seattle. Continue onto Chinook Pass Hwy/SE Enumclaw Chinook Pass Rd to Crystal Mountain Boulevard.

Stevens Pass

  • Distance from Portland: 250 miles (~ 4 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site
  • Ability Level: All levels

Stevens Pass is another one of the ski resorts near Portland that people in the Pacific Northwest absolutely love. Located between two national forests, the resort boasts over 1,000 acres of skiable terrain, with 52 trails and numerous bowls, glades, and faces. With night skiing five days a week, there’s literally no shortage of time to explore the many trails that Stevens Pass has to offer. While the park does have trails for all skill levels, the vast majority are rated intermediate or advanced.

For non-riders and non-skiers, there’s free snow tubing available at Stevens Pass, as well as the charming Bavarian ski town of Leavenworth nearby. There are also options to go snowshoeing on the property as well.

How to Get There: Take the Interstate 5 N exit toward Seattle, exit onto US-2 E toward Wenatchee and continue on US_2 to resort.

Anthony Lakes

  • Distance from Portland: 292 miles (~4.5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site
  • Ability Level: All levels, mostly intermediate and advanced

At 4.5 hours away, you might be wondering why we’ve included Anthony Lakes on our list of places for snowboarding and skiing near Portland. Our answer? Because it has some of the coolest trails for experienced skiers. Originally part of the Oregon Trail, Anthony Lakes was voted as the “friendliest little ski area in the USA.” With a base elevation of 7,100 feet, it’s one of the highest skiing spots in the state.

Advanced skiers love this resort because it has steep cliff slopes and various backcountry options accessible by cat. There’s also a sizable area for Nordic skiing here as well.

Pro tip: Every Thursday, Anthony Lakes offers half price lift tickets!

How to Get There: If you are driving, start on Pacific Hwy W, then follow signs for U.S. 30 E/Interstate 84 E/The Dalles. Take exit 285 for US-30/OR-237 toward N Powder/Haines to Anthony Lakes Highway (the resort is right off of the highway).

Additional Resources for Skiing Near Portland, OR

What to Pack

  • Waterproof outerwear – Possibly the most critical pieces of clothing for your ski trip packing list is durable, waterproof outerwear. Burton and Helly Hansen are famous ski brands for having best-in-class clothing that will keep you warm in the coldest, snowiest conditions. Click here to shop ski jackets and compare prices.
  • Thermal layers – Thermal baselayers are absolutely critical for a smooth skiing experience, as these will keep you warm and dry underneath your outerwear. The best kinds of thermal baselayers are made of Merino wool, which is moisture-wicking and comfortable. Our favorite brand of thermal layers is SmartWool – their tops and leggings are soft, lightweight, but warm and durable for all kinds of outdoor activities, including skiing. Click here to shop thermal tops and leggings and compare prices.
  • Ski goggles – No ski trip packing list would be complete without a pair of fog-resistant ski goggles, especially if you’re going somewhere that makes artificial snow. Ski slopes often have snow blowing into the air several times a day and it can be hard to keep freezing snowflakes out of your eyes, even during clear days. We use and recommend these ski goggles. However, you can shop ski goggles and compare reviews/prices here.

If you’re looking for a more comprehensive list of things to pack, head to our Ultimate Ski Trip Packing List to view our full packing list and gear recommendations for the slopes!

Additional Links


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New York City might seem like all skyscrapers and concrete from afar, but if you look closely, it’s also a city with tranquil green spaces and fantastic access to hiking trails. Case in point: the fantastic variety of hikes near NYC that you can get to easily on public transportation! We asked locals, snooped online, and wandered the Big Apple ourselves to come up with our guide to the best and most beautiful places for hiking near NYC.

…and the added bonus? All 18 of them are accessible without a car!

Incredible Urban Trails for Hiking In NYC

The High Line

  • Location: Western Manhattan
  • How to get there:
  • Distance: 1.45 miles
  • Difficulty: Easy

Known as a tourist hotspot, the High Line is an industrial trail that starts in New York’s Meatpacking District, runs through Chelsea, and ends near the Javits Center. Originally, the trail historically served as a viaduct for the New York Central Railroad, and opened in 2009 as a hiking trail after being repurposed by the city.

Boasting beautiful city skyline views, paved pathways, and a central location, this short and leisurely hike is a fantastic one to do on your own or with the family. Here, you’ll trade forests and mountains for buildings and people watching, but we promise it’s a great way to see New York City outdoors.

Pro tip: Go early in the morning to avoid the crowds and get some solitude before the rush of tourists hits the trail.

Stunning tree-lined pathways in Central Park, NYC

Central Park

  • Location: Central Manhattan
  • Distance: Varies
  • Difficulty: Easy to moderate

Everyone who knows New York City knows Central Park, the expansive, wooded green area that lies right in the middle of Manhattan. On sunny weekends it seems like the whole city is here, running, reading on the grass, or chatting with a friend on a park bench. While there’s no specific route here we recommend the most, we do love getting lost on the tree-lined trails for hours and people watching along the way.

Pro tip: Central Park is a nice place for a walk or a hike during any season, but we’d recommend heading there in the fall. Fiery colors light up the park for a truly magical scene.

Bronx River Greenway

  • Location: The Bronx
  • How to get there: Take the 5 train all the way to 241st Street, the trail begins near the train exit
  • Distance: 8 miles
  • Difficulty: Moderate

A hidden gem in the Bronx, the Bronx River Greenway is popular with local paddlers and anyone wanting to soak in the peaceful forest vibes this river trail has to offer. Extending 8 miles, the river here was recently restored and has cool, clean water to swim in. On summer days you can find nature lovers out here to play – splashing in the water or hiking through the meandering trails of the park. If you’re looking for true nature hideaways for hiking in NYC, you’ll certainly find one here.

Pro tip: Bring a swimsuit! You can easily pair your hiking adventure with a kayaking excursion down the Bronx River or a quick swim.

Brooklyn-Queens Greenway

  • Location: Brooklyn & Queens
  • How to get there: Take the 7 train, then get off at the Main Street-Flushing stop and find the trail head nearby
  • Distance: Varies, total length is 40 miles
  • Difficulty: Varies

If you’re looking for hikes in NYC that take you through diverse urban and nature areas, the Brooklyn-Queens Greenway might be a great choice for you. This massive trail system runs through two boroughs and spans wildlife areas, forests, marshes, residential streets, and city parks. For runners, the trail offers an excellent stretch of largely uninterrupted running that will keep your senses stimulated for miles and miles.

Pro Tip: Near Alley Pond Park, you can spot what some say is the oldest living organism in New York City – a tulip tree lovingly named the “Queens Giant”.

Photo Credit: Kenneth Dellaquila

White Trail at Alley Pond Park

  • Location: Queens
  • How to Get There: Take the QM6 bus to Union Tpk/226th St, then walk ~15 minutes to Alley Pond Park
  • Distance: 3.4 miles
  • Difficulty: Easy

Speaking of Alley Pond Park, this beautiful park area is definitely worth a visit if you want to go hiking in NYC, even if you aren’t exploring the Brooklyn-Queens Greenway. Like we mentioned, you can find LOTS of trees here, including pine forests and the famous “Queens Giant” tulip tree. The White Trail is a family-friendly, easy hike that brings hikers of all levels away from the city streets and into what feels like pure, serene woods. The park sits on a moraine formed by a glacier and is home to many ecosystems across its forests, wetlands, and other terrain.

Gerritsen Creek Nature Trail

  • Location: Brooklyn, near Jamaica Bay
  • How to get there: The B3 bus goes directly to Marine Park, where you can find Gerritsen Creek Nature Trail
  • Distance: 1 mile
  • Difficulty: Easy

If you’re an avid bird watcher or wildlife lover, the easy, shoreside Gerritsen Creek Nature Trail is a fantastic spot to see all kinds of wetland wildlife, from herons to fish species. Located on the site of a former indigenous fishing settlement, Marine Park (where Gerritsen Creek is located) has undergone significant changes of the centuries, from industrialization to revitalization into a nature area. Nearby, you can also walk to numerous beach areas to enjoy the bay and the seaside vibes.

Photo Credit: Dana (Flickr CC)

Blue Trail at Inwood Hill Park

  • Location: Manhattan
  • How to Get There: Take the A train to 207th St station
  • Distance: 1.7 miles
  • Difficulty: Easy

Inwood Hill Park is a beautiful spot in Manhattan for hiking in NYC. The Blue Trail is its longest trail, winding through the park for a modest 1.7 miles. In this short hike, you’ll have the chance to see caves, ancient rock formations, and glacial potholes. At the Overlook Meadow, you can catch stunning views of the Hudson River across to the New Jersey Palisades. From the trail, you may also have the chance to spot a majestic bald eagle – Inwood Hill Park is known as one of the best areas in NYC to see them.

The Yellow Trail at Staten Island Greenbelt

  • Location: Staten Island
  • How to get there: Take the Staten Island ferry, then from the terminal, take the S62 bus. Disembark at Bradley Avenue and transfer to the S57 bus, which will take you to Brielle & Rockland Ave. The entrance is nearby.
  • Distance: 8 miles
  • Difficulty: Moderate to difficult

We couldn’t leave off New York’s final borough, Staten Island, and its lovely Greenbelt Conservancy & Nature Center. This diverse green area has 6 trails, including four that are only for hikers (no bikes allowed!). The Yellow Trail is unique because it’s a bit more challenging compared to other hikes in NYC. Gems like Todt Hill and Moses Mountain, as well as bald eagle spotting, await hikers who make the trek out to this nature center.

Photo Credit: Tom’s Playground (Flickr CC)

Hudson River Greenway

  • Location: Western Manhattan
  • How to get there: Any train or bus heading west in Manhattan
  • Distance: 12.9 miles total
  • Difficulty: Easy

As one of Manhattan’s most popular walking, hiking, and biking trails, we absolutely could not leave off the Hudson River Greenway as one fabulous spot for hiking in NYC. While this isn’t a place to go for nature or wildlife, it’s fantastic for people-watching and for soaking in the cosmopolitan feels of Manhattan. Along the trail, you’ll get fantastic views of both the city and the river, and on sunny, warm days, you’ll be in good company, as it’s a beloved outdoor hotspot that’s centrally located.

Best Hikes Near NYC (That You Can Visit Without A Car)

Breakneck Ridge - Best hikes near NYC
Photo Credit: Jeff P (Flickr CC)

Breakneck Ridge

  • Location: Cold Spring, NY (~1 hour from NYC)
  • How to get there: On weekends, take Metro-North from Grand Central Station all the way to Breakneck Ridge
  • Distance: 4 miles
  • Difficulty: Difficult

A local favorite for a more challenging, mountainous trail, Breakneck Ridge combines gorgeous scenery with accessibility to the city. At just one hour away from Gran Central Station, Breakneck Ridge is a fantastic spot for hiking near NYC that’s perfect for an adventurous day trip. The trail is about 4 miles of moderate to challenging terrain, including a few areas that require scrambling. Tough inclines are worth it, though – the views from the top of surrounding forests and mountainsides are absolutely jaw-dropping.

Lake Skenonto Trail at Harriman State Park

  • Location: Sloatsburg, NY
  • How to get there: Take the NJ Transit train from Penn Station to Tuxedo Station, then walk 0.5 miles to the trail head
  • Distance: 8.1 miles
  • Difficulty: Moderate

If you’re looking for a true escape from New York City, the Lake Skenonto Trail at Harriman State Park winds through forested areas and rolling hills to a serene lake. Here, you can expect a moderate level of hiking, namely a few steep uphills to hike through the mountains before arriving at the lake. The trail is largely forested, but opens up to blue skies as you approach the lake. At just one hour from the city, the Lake Skenonto Trail is one of the most easily accessible nature hikes near NYC on our list.

Pro tip: If you’re visiting in the heat of summer, be sure to pack a swimsuit and towel and enjoy the cool, fresh waters of the lake as a reward!

Photo Credit: Eden, Janine and Jim (Flickr CC)

Old Croton Aqueduct Trail

  • Location: Dobbs Ferry, NY
  • How to get there: Take Metro-North from Grand Central Station to Ossining; you can begin your hike on the trail 0.5 miles from the station (click here for detailed directions)
  • Distance: 26 miles total (can be shortened)
  • Difficulty: Easy

For history lovers, the Old Croton Aqueduct Trail is one of the best hikes near NYC, where you can walk through the former area that ran fresh water from upstate into New York City.

Aside from being in the aqueduct itself, the trail also features some really interesting sites dating back 175 years or more, like the New Croton Dam, historic homes, and the real life Sleepy Hollow village (yes, the one with the Headless Horseman…). As an easy trail that’s suitable for hikers of all levels, Old Croton Aqueduct is a wonderful place to trade the city for tree-lined trails.

Arden Point and Glenclyffe

  • Location: Cold Spring, NY
  • How to get there: Take the Metro-North Hudson train to Garrison, then find the signs at the station for “Arden Point – Hudson Highlands State Park”
  • Distance: 3.8 miles
  • Difficulty: Easy

Easy, beautiful, and accessible – what makes for a better hike than that? Arden Point and Glenclyffe is a strikingly beautiful trail through pathways used during the Revolutionary War. Aside from the history, there are tons of scenic lookouts and breathtaking views from this loop trail, including views of the Hudson River, West Point, and some pretty lavish upstate homes.

Once you head towards the trail from the train, you’ll cross a steel bridge before starting towards Arden Point. Along the loop trail, you’ll find ruins of old buildings and serene forest areas dotted with lots of pretty views.

Storm King Art Center is a collection of more than 100 carefully placed sculptures

Storm King State Park & Art Center

  • Location: New Windsor, NY
  • How to get there: Take the Metro-North Hudson line from Grand Central Station to Beacon Station, then a shuttle to Storm King. There’s also a discounted pass sold at Grand Central called the Metro-North Getaway Package.
  • Distance: Varies
  • Difficulty: Easy

One of the most unique places for hiking near NYC is Storm King State Park – kind of like a state park meets an art exhibit. The park a naturally beautiful and scenic area with rolling hills and large meadows, and there are several trails all over the area that lead to various, massive art structures. Art lovers will enjoy this cross-section of nature trails, permanent art fixtures, and shifting exhibitions, and nature lovers will enjoy the many twists and turns the trail takes through the park area.

Stairway to Heaven (Appalachian Trail)

  • Location: Vernon, NJ
  • How to get there: Catch the NJ Transit bus #196 or #197 to Warwick. From there, it’s a 10-minute Uber or taxi to the trail
  • Distance: 2.9 miles
  • Difficulty: Moderate

For hikers who enjoy a challenge, as well as lots of surprises along the trail, Stairway to Heaven is one of the best spots for hiking near NYC. Located in New Jersey, the trail takes you to the top of Mount Wawayanda, twisting through rocky areas and forests to the summit, which boasts stunning views of the surrounding hills. Along the 2.9 mile trail, there are tons of beautiful rock formations as well as a picturesque suspension bridge.

Pro tip: With large, varied rock formations, climbers should come with gear to take advantage of the bouldering and scrambling opportunities.

Historic Fire Island Lighthouse in Fire Island National Seashore

Fire Island National Seashore

  • Location: Long Island, NY
  • How to get there: Take the Montauk Branch of the LIRR from Penn Station to Bay Shore, Sayville, or Patchogue to access ferry terminals. From there, you can find a list of ferry options to various parts of the seashore here.
  • Distance: Varies
  • Difficulty: Varies, mostly easy

Located on Long Island’s coast, Fire Island National Seashore is a different kind of hiking experience than the one on our list. For starters, much of the park area is only accessible by ferry, meaning you’ll need to set aside a full day for Fire Island. Second, since it’s so remote, you’ll be able to find fairly private seaside trails year-round, unlike some of the more popular spots on our list. The park boasts a beautiful historic lighthouse as well as sandy shorelines where you can explore. Just make sure to stay off the dunes – they’re protected areas on the island for many reasons.

Anthony’s Nose Trail (Appalachian Trail)

  • Location: Hudson Highlands, NY
  • How to get there: Take the Metro-North Hudson line and get off at the Manitou stop, then walk 1.5 miles to the trail head
  • Distance: 2.6 miles (5.6 including walk from the train)
  • Difficulty: Moderate

If you’re wanting to explore even more sections of the Appalachian Trail, Anthony’s Nose is a great place for hiking near New York City. Connected to the nearby Camp Smith Trail, this hike can lengthened depending on how far you’d like to go.

Accessible by Metro-North, the short stretch of the Appalachian Trail at Anthony’s Nose features a 500-foot rock staircase – a real workout – following by stunning views along the mountain ridge. From the top, you can see the Hudson River, the Bear Mountain Bridge, and the surrounding mountains.

Bellvale Mountain (Appalachian Trail)

  • Location: Warwick, NY
  • How to get there: Catch the NJ Transit bus #197 to Route 17A and Kain Road, then walk to Continental Road to begin the hike
  • Distance: 8 miles (one way)
  • Difficulty: Difficult/Expert

For hikers wanting a bit more challenge than the other trails on this list, the Bellvale Mountain trail on the Appalachian Trail is a challenging ridge hike that requires some experience under your belt. Not for the faint of heart, those who do tackle the Bellvale Mountain trail will be rewarded with incredible views from the Prospect Rock viewpoint, which is the highest post of the Appalachian Trail in the state of New York. From the top, you’ll see breathtaking vistas of nearby Greenwood Lake, Sterling Forest, and the surrounding areas.

Additional Resources on Hiking Near NYC


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If you’re anything like us, you’re probably sitting at home or at your desk at work dreaming of fresh air and outdoor adventures in beautiful places. And, aside from actually adventuring, one of the best ways to get inspired is by reading some uplifting outdoor quotes. We curated this complete list of over 50 of our favorite outdoor quotes to help inspire you to plan your next adventure.

As outdoor lovers, we know that sometimes a little shot of inspiration and motivation is what you need to get to the summit. These words of wisdom from some of the world’s most famous and brave adventurers will motivate you to hit the trails ASAP!

Wild and Adventurous Outdoor Quotes

Our love of the outdoors rests in a sense of wonder and awe at the beauty of nature and the wildness of the outdoors. These hand-picked outdoor quotes explain the sweeping feeling of being surrounded by the nature and fresh air of the outdoors.

1. “Real freedom lies in wildness, not in civilization.” – Charles Lindbergh

2. “The wilderness holds answers to questions man has not yet learned to ask.” Nancy Newhall

3. “No matter the risks we take, we always consider the end to be too soon, even though in life, more than anything else, quality should be more important than quantity.” Alex Honnold

4. “Live the life you’ve dreamed.” Henry David Thoreau

5. “Life is full of beauty. Notice it. Notice the bumble bee, the small child, and the smiling faces. Smell the rain, and feel the wind. Live your life to the fullest potential, and fight for your dreams.” – Ashley Smith

6. “The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness.” – John Muir

7. “Now I see the secret of making the best person, it is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth.” Walt Whitman

8. “All that is gold does not glitter, not all who wander are lost.” – JRR Tolkien

9. “Live in the sunshine, swim in the sea, drink the wild air’s salubrity.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

10. “The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences, and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun.” – Alexander Supertramp Mccandless

Motivating Outdoor Quotes for When the Trail Gets Tough

Hiking is one of the most inspiring, beautiful ways to explore a new place, especially national or state parks. Whenever I get a chance to escape the city, you can find me on the hiking trails. These amazing outdoor quotes spark the wonder and excitement for adventure within us, even when we’re nowhere near the trails.

11. “If you’re going through hell, keep going.” Winston Churchill

12. “A bad day camping is still better than a good day working.” – Anonymous

13. “Anywhere is within walking distance.” Anonymous

14. “Through struggle to the stars.” Latin Proverb

15. “There are no shortcuts to any place worth going.” – Beverly Sills

16. “Just get out and do it. Just get out and do it.” Alexander Supertramp Mccandless

17. “No Pain, No Rain, No Maine.” – Appalachian Trail Saying

18. “The best thing one can do when it’s raining is to let it rain.” – Henry Longfellow

19. “Hiking’s not for everyone. Notice the wilderness is mostly empty.” – Sonja Yoerg

20. “You need special shoes for hiking—and a bit of a special soul as well.” – Terri Guillemets

21. “If the winter is too cold and the summer is too hot, you are not a hiker.” – Anonymous

22. “Backpacking: An extended form of hiking in which people carry double the amount of gear they need for half the distance they planned to go in twice the time it should take.” – Anonymous

23. “The best way out is always through.” – Robert Frost

24. “We don’t stop hiking because we grow old. We grow old because we stop hiking.” – Finis Mitchell

Inspiring Walking & Hiking Quotes

There’s something so nice about taking a walk outdoors, wherever in the world you are. Whether you’re in the middle of New York City or out in the middle of nowhere, walking opens the senses and the mind to everything around you. 

25. “An early-morning walk is a blessing for the whole day.” – Henry David Thoreau

26. “Walking is a man’s best medicine.” Hippocrates

27. “Walking: the most ancient exercise and still the best modern exercise.” – Carrie Latet

28. “Days of slow walking are very long: they make you live longer, because you have allowed every hour, every minute, every second to breathe, to deepen, instead of filling them up by straining the joints.” Frederic Gros

29. “Hiking and happiness go hand in hand or foot in boot.” – Diane Spicer

30. “The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quiet, alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be and that God wishes to see people happy, amidst the simple beauty of nature. I firmly believe that nature brings solace in all troubles.” Anne Frank

31. “The sky is the daily bread of the eyes.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

32. “All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.” Friedrich Nietzsche

33. “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” – Lao-Tzu

34. “Hiking is not escapism; it’s realism. The people who choose to spend time outdoors are not running away from anything; we are returning to where we belong.” – Jennifer Pharr Davis

35. “Returning home is the most difficult part of long-distance hiking. You have grown outside the puzzle and your piece no longer fits.” Cindy Ross

36. “If you are seeking creative ideas, go out walking. Angels whisper to a man when he goes for a walk.” – Raymond Inmon

37. “After a day’s walk, everything has twice its usual value.” – G.M. Trevelyan

38. “I took a walk in the woods and came out taller than the trees.” – Henry David Thoreau

Photo Credit: Sajith T S (Flickr CC)

Nature & Outdoors Quotes

We all get outside, to an extent, because we crave the wildness and beauty of nature. These wilderness and outdoors quotes draw on those strong emotions of fear, wonder, and awe that nature often evokes in us.

39. “Deep down, at the molecular heart of life, the trees and we are essentially identical.” – Carl Sagan

40. “The Earth has music for those who listen.” William Shakespeare

41. “Look deep into nature and you will understand everything better.” – Albert Einstein

42. “In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.”  Aristotle

43. “The environment, after all, is where we all meet, where we all have a mutual interest. It is one thing that all of us share. It is not only a mirror of ourselves, but a focusing lens on what we can become.” – Lady Bird Johnson

44. “Nature is not a place to visit. It is home.” Gary Snyder

45. “And into the forest I go, to lose my mind and find my soul.” – John Muir

Outdoor Exploration Quotes

There is something special about adventuring and exploring in an unknown place. These exploration-themed outdoor quotes below touch on that same emotion.

46. “Hiking in undiscovered places is a lot of fun.” Karolina Kurkova

47. “As human beings, we have an innate need to explore, to see what’s around the corner.” – Jimmy Chin

48. “Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt.” – John Muir

49. “I see my path, but I don’t know where it leads. Not knowing where I’m going is what inspires me to travel it.” Rosalia de Castro

50. “The greatest adventure is what lies ahead.” JRR Tolkien

There you have it, folks! 50 of the best, most inspiring outdoor quotes out there. Now that you’re feeling adventurous, why not check out our latest guides or our favorite gifts for outdoor lovers?

Additional Resources Similar to Outdoor Adventure Quotes


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While many people know Las Vegas for the dazzling lights of the Strip, what you might not know is that it’s actually a pretty awesome hub for winter sports, too. If you’re wanting to trade casinos and sunshine for snow and fresh air, these ski resorts near Las Vegas are a fantastic getaway. Don’t forget to plan your trip to these legendary places for snowboarding and skiing near Las Vegas before the season is over!

Top Ski Resorts Near Las Vegas

Lee Canyon Ski Resort

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 49 miles (~50 minutes)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site, but there are hotels nearby
  • Ability Level: Mostly intermediate and advanced

Lee Canyon Ski Resort is a ski area near Las Vegas that caters mostly to intermediate and advanced skiers and snowboarders. Since Lee Canyon is the closest of the ski resorts near Las Vegas, it’s a perfect spot for a day trip to shred the slopes. The resort boasts 445 acres of skiable terrain, with 26 trails, most of which are intermediate or advanced.

Ponderosa Glade comes highly recommended by visitors and locals as the most beautiful glade to ski on the mountain. While there’s no lodge on-site, there’s currently one under construction and there are plenty of hotels nearby.

How to Get There: The best way to get to Lee Canyon is by car. If driving, start on US-95 N, then NV-156 S to the mountain.

Brian Head Resort

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 200 miles (~3 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Affiliated with 3 lodges and the Best Western (ski and stay packages), more hotels in area not affiliated with the resort
  • Ability Level: All levels

Located in some of Utah’s highest elevations, Brian Head Resort is known for getting a LOT of natural snow. It’s the perfect place for a weekend of snowboarding or skiing near Las Vegas, and it’s just a 3 hour drive away. The resort consists of two connected mountains – Giant Steps and Navajo. With 71 runs spanning easy to difficult, the 650 acres of skiable terrain here is fantastic for all levels.

Visitors love the snow here, and its proximity to spectacular parks like Zion National Park. Additionally, guests love that the resort is very family friendly, with tons of programs to learn skiing or snowboarding for beginners.

How to Get There: If driving, start on I-15 N to US-95 N towards Salt Lake City, then take UT-143 S to the resort.

Photo Credit: Russ Allison Loar (Flickr CC)

Mountain High Resort

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 224 miles (~3 hours, 20 minutes)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site; closest hotel is Canyon Creek Inn
  • Ability Level: All levels

You probably didn’t know that you can find winter sports in sunny Southern California, did you? Known as “Southern California’s closest winter resort,” Mountain High Resort is located in the Saint Gabriel Mountains near Los Angeles. It’s also the most visited resort in Southern California. At just under 3.5 hours from Las Vegas, locals can easily visit Mountain High as a weekend getaway.

There are 3 conjoined resorts here – the West, East, and North Resorts. At the properties, you can snowboard or ski down a combined 59 total trails, the combination of three formerly separate resorts. The resort now consists of a variety of trails from first-time friendly hills to advanced and expert-level runs. While it’s not the largest spot on our list, Mountain High is one of the best ski resorts near Las Vegas thrilling ski trip.

How to Get There: If driving, start o I-15 S towards LA, then CA-138 W to Table Mountain Rd, to resort.

Mt. Baldy Resort

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 242 miles (~3.5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site
  • Ability Level: All levels

At 3.5 hours from the city, Mt. Baldy Resort is a wonderful place to go snowboarding and skiing near Las Vegas and was recently rated the #1 mountain resort in California. It’s a smaller resort, with around 800 skiable acres, but one that’s quite beloved since it’s easy to reach in a short day trip from downtown LA. Snowboarders and skiers enjoy the varied trails, and the gorgeous views of the surroundings and the ocean from the top of the mountain.

With 26 total trails, Mt. Baldy has a pretty even spread of beginner, intermediate, advanced, and expert-level trails, making it one of the more well-rounded ski resorts in Southern California. For beginners, they’ve got ski and snowboard lessons and rentals to help get you started. They’ve also got dining and lounge options for rest in between hitting the slopes. You can get steep discounts on lift tickets if you purchase online in advance.

How to Get There: If driving, start on I-15 S towards LA, then CA-210 W towards Pasadena, onto Mt. Baldy Rd. to resort.

Bear Mountain Resort

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 314 miles (~3.5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Yes, Big Bear Condo Resort
  • Ability Level: All levels

Bear Mountain Resort is a Southern California gem that’s made up of 2 different resort areas – Big Bear and Snow Summit. All lift tickets at the resort are good for both areas, which offer a combined 26 trails across all levels (plus, they’re free on your birthday!).

Big Bear is a small but mighty ski area that packs a punch among the places to go snowboarding and skiing near Las Vegas. At Big Bear, the majority of runs are rated as blue, or intermediate level. However, there are a handful of trails in the beginner, advanced, and expert categories.

As the sister resort to Big Bear, Snow Summit isn’t far from its flagship resort, and has its own unique array of trails and slopes to explore. It, too, caters largely to intermediate-level skiers, with nearly 50% of its trails rated in the blue category. According to the Big Bear website, Snow Summit is meant to offer a “traditional alpine atmosphere with a great deal of intermediate terrain and mainstream cruising for skiers and snowboarders.”

How to Get There: If driving, start on I-15 S towards LA, then CA-247 S onto Big Bear Blvd to the resort. If not driving, there is a bus from downtown Las Vegas almost directly to the resort (about a 10 minute walk from where the bus drops you off, $28)

Eagle Point Ski Area

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 241 miles (~3.5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Yes, at Eagle Point Resort
  • Ability Level: All levels

Eagle Point Ski Area is a charming, smaller resort located in the Tushar Mountains, with 40 runs across 650 skiable acres. The grounds offer a variety of trails across different ski levels, and boasts some of the best powder skiing that Utah has to offer. Their Lookout Lodge has some of the most stunning views in the area, and there are many charming parts of the resort to wander through.

As the resort is not as commercialized or crowded, and it boasts no lines for its lifts. With its affordable prices and locally-owned reputations, it’s a great family-friendly spot for skiing near Las Vegas.

How to Get There: If driving, start on I-15 N towards Salt Lake City, then UT-21 to Beavers, then UT-153 E to resort. If not driving, there is a bus that runs once a day from downtown Las Vegas directly to Beaver, UT, (5 hr, $35) then 18 miles drive to the actual mountain.

Alta Sierra Ski Resort

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 308 miles (~5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: None on site
  • Ability Level: Mostly intermediate and advanced

Located in the southern region of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Alta Sierra Ski Resort is a small ski area that’s part of Sequoia National Park. With just 11 trails, the resort really packs a punch for more experienced skiers and snowboarders. 4 of the advanced runs are in wooded areas and aren’t groomed, making for an extra fun challenge.

Frequented by Bakersfield locals, it’s a family-friendly resort with snow tubing and a warming hut for cold days. While it may be a little far for such a small resort, this is a great place to go snowboarding and skiing near Las Vegas when paired with a California road trip.

How to Get There: If driving, start on I-15 S towards LA, then CA-58 W towards Bakersfield,then CA-178 W to CA-155 to Wolford Heights.

Mammoth Mountain

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 313 miles (~5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Slope side inn and lodge, hotels in surrounding area (Mammoth Lakes)
  • Ability Level: All levels

If you’re looking for the full “ski trip” experience, look no further than Mammoth Mountain. Its namesake came from the Mammoth Mining Co, which was a gold mining company during the gold rush in the 1800s. Today, this ski resort and ski town combination make for a fabulous family-friendly snowboard and ski combination that’s about a 5 hour drive from Las Vegas. There are a whopping 154 runs in the resort over 3,500 acres, ranging from bunny hills and learning areas to double black diamond expert terrain.

Here at Mammoth Mountain, there’s an atmosphere that’s totally welcoming and supportive of beginners, which means you’re in luck as a first-timer, with plenty of daily ski lessons and gear rentals available. The vast majority of trails here are beginner to intermediate level, but there are a handful marked as advanced and expert for more experienced skiers. Visitors generally rave about the fabulous snow conditions on the park premises, as well as the additional snow tubing opportunities during down time.

How to Get There: If driving, start on US-95 N to US-395 N, to CA-203 towards Mammoth Lakes, to Lake Mary Rd to resort. If not driving, there is a bus from Las Vegas to Mammoth Lakes, have a 10 minute drive to the actual mountain from drop off.

Park City Mountain Resort

We’ve, of course, saved a whopper for last: Park City Mountain Resort, one of the most massive ski resorts in the country with over 7,300 acres of skiable terrain. There are over 330 trails across 17 peaks in this expansive resort, 115 which are open for night skiing. Park City Mountain Resort is especially catered toward intermediate to expert-level skiers, with 90%+ of the trails ranked as intermediate or harder.

Originally a silver mining town, Park City Mountain Resort offer year-round outdoor activities. In the winter, you’ll find a seemingly endless amount of trail options, 8 terrain parks, and a variety of resources for beginner skiers. The upscale on-site resort is a great spot for a family vacation activities, with plenty of non-ski activities like winter zip lining, snowmobiling, and mountain tours.

How to Get There: If driving, start on I-15 N towards Salt Lake City, then UT- 52 E then to Main St to the resort. If not driving, there are buses multiple times a day directly from Las Vegas to Park City ($83).

Squaw Valley & Alpine Meadows Resorts

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 481 miles (~7.5 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Yes, at Squaw Valley Ski Resort
  • Ability Level: All levels

Alpine Meadows and its sister park Squaw Valley make up a massive ski complex near Lake Tahoe, one of the largest in the country. This park is made up of 170 trails across 6,000+ acres of skiable terrain and hosted the 1960 Winter Olympics.

There are 3 different peaks between the two resorts with tons of variety in terrain for all levels. “Snow Ventures” is a small hill primarily for junior skiers and snowboarders. “Big Blue” is comprised of gentle slopes and is made up of 60% green trails. KT-22 is for the experts; it includes 2,000 feet of cliffs and near vertical drops. Lift tickets are on the more expensive side compared to others on this list, but you get access to a large and well-run park. This resort is also partnered with the Ikon Pass

How to Get There: If you are driving, start on US-95 N, then continue to NV-439 to CA-89 S to resort.

Mt. Rose

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 446 miles (~7 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: None on mountain, hotels and condos either in reno (25 min) or Incline Village on Tahoe’s north shore
  • Ability Level: All levels

With 60+ trails over 1,200 acres of skiable terrain, Mt. Rose (AKA “the Biggest Little Mountain”) is a fantastic option for ski resorts near Las Vegas, especially if you’re already planning to visit the Lake Tahoe region anyway. Located in the Carson Mountains, this resort has the highest base elevation in the Lake Tahoe area. The trails here are largely intermediate and advanced, but ~20% of them are beginner-friendly.

As a less crowded option to nearby Squaw Valley, it’s an affordable and family-friendly option for those coming in from out of town. You can even catch beautiful views of the lake on many of the runs!

How to Get There: If driving, start on US-95 N to US-50, then NV-431 W to the resort.

Heavenly Mountain Resort

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 443 miles (~7 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Yes, at Heavenly Village Condos
  • Ability Level: All levels

Heavenly Mountain Resort is probably one of the most thrilling and picturesque ski resorts near San Francisco. With stunning views of Lake Tahoe from its southern banks and a magnificent spread of 97 trails over 4,800 skiable acres, Heavenly Mountain should definitely be on your skiing near Las Vegas bucket list. If you’ve got an Epic Pass, you’re in luck – Heavenly is part of their network!

Beginners should note that Heavenly Mountain has a heavy focus on intermediate, advanced, and expert-level runs. Only 8% of the trails are beginner-friendly, although they do have a ski school to learn the ropes. They’re also home to the Ridge Rider Mountain Coaster, a gravity powered alpine roller coaster!

How to Get There: If driving, start on Us-95 N to NV-339 S to Us-50 W to resort.

Ruby Mountain

  • Distance from Las Vegas: 443 miles (~7 hours)
  • Accommodations Available: Not on site
  • Ability Level: All levels

Located in the Ruby Mountain Range near Elko, NV, Ruby Mountain is a huge ski resort that has over 400 runs. While it’s 7 hours away from Las Vegas, this unique resort is well worth the trek – with 10 peaks above 11,000 feet and stunning views of alpine lakes nearby, it’s heaven for outdoor lovers, riders, and skiers.

However, we’re not here to tell you just about that…Ruby Mountain is on our list for its epic helicopter skiing programs. A helicopter will fly 5 passengers at a time for some seriously epic backcountry skiing with an experienced guide. The experience is so incredible, it’s been featured on high-profile publications like Forbes and National Geographic.

How to Get There: If driving, start on US-93 N towards Salt Lake City, then NV-229 W onto Mountain View Rd to the resort.

Additional Resources for Skiing Near Las Vegas

What to Pack

  • Waterproof outerwear – Possibly the most critical pieces of clothing for your ski trip packing list is durable, waterproof outerwear. Burton and Helly Hansen are famous ski brands for having best-in-class clothing that will keep you warm in the coldest, snowiest conditions. Click here to shop ski jackets and compare prices.
  • Thermal layers – Thermal baselayers are absolutely critical for a smooth skiing experience, as these will keep you warm and dry underneath your outerwear. The best kinds of thermal baselayers are made of Merino wool, which is moisture-wicking and comfortable. Our favorite brand of thermal layers is SmartWool – their tops and leggings are soft, lightweight, but warm and durable for all kinds of outdoor activities, including skiing. Click here to shop thermal tops and leggings and compare prices.
  • Ski goggles – No ski trip packing list would be complete without a pair of fog-resistant ski goggles, especially if you’re going somewhere that makes artificial snow. Ski slopes often have snow blowing into the air several times a day and it can be hard to keep freezing snowflakes out of your eyes, even during clear days. We use and recommend these ski goggles. However, you can shop ski goggles and compare reviews/prices here.

If you’re looking for a more comprehensive list of things to pack, head to our Ultimate Ski Trip Packing List to view our full packing list and gear recommendations for the slopes!

Additional Links


When you’ve got someone close to you who’s constantly longing to strap on skis and hit the slopes, it might be difficult to think of an appropriate gift. A LOT of snowboarding and skiing gear is a) expensive, b) size-dependent, and c) not intuitive for people who don’t do those sports, so buying a present for these folks can be tricky. Don’t worry, we’ve got your back – this massive guide has 30 incredible gifts for skiers and snowboarders that they’ll use on the slopes and remember for years to come.

Most Practical Gifts for Skiers & Snowboarders

Smith Ski Goggles

Goggles are a snowboarder or skier’s best friend: they keep snow, water, and wind out of your eyes, plus they make you look pretty freaking awesome. Smith ski goggles are very durable and come in a variety of colors, styles, and sizes.

Wildhorn Ski Helmet

A helmet is one of the best gifts for skiers and snowboarders because it will come in handy every time they’re on the slopes. While prices for these range substantially, we’ve found that Wildhorn helmets are well-respected as their ski helmets are comfortable, practical, and come with a built-in goggle strap.

Smartwool Base Layers

All snowboarders and skiers need warm baselayers, and they make for one of the most practical snowboarding and skiing gifts. Smartwool’s Merino 250 baselayer line offers extra-warm, cozy layers that wick sweat and moisture seamlessly on the slopes.

Burton Ski & Snowboard Jacket

A warm, waterproof ski jacket is essential to a fun day on the slopes. While there are tons of brands that make outerwear, Burton ski jackets are designed especially for winter sports, making them perfect gifts for snowboarders and skiers.

Rossignol Ski Pants

Like a good, durable coat, waterproof ski pants are essential because, as everyone knows, skiers and snowboarders spent plenty of time sitting in the snow. Rossignol makes some of the warmest and most durable ski pants that are perfect for a full day of shredding the slopes.

The North Face Montana Gore-Tex Gloves

Insulated gloves are a skier or snowboarder’s best friends, and these Montana Gore-Tex Gloves by The North Face are excellent additions to any skier’s or snowboarder’s gear set. They come with cuffs so you won’t lose them, and they have e-tip functionality so you can use your touch screens while wearing them!

Epic Pass

While neither cheap nor durable, an Epic Pass is the ultimate gift for the travel-loving skier. Usable at over 60 ski resorts all around the United States, the Epic Pass is one of the best gifts for skiers and snowboarders that money can buy.

Cheap Snowboarding & Skiing Gifts ($25 or Less)

Smartwool Hiking Socks

Yes, yes, we know this isn’t a gift guide about hiking, but Smartwool’s hiking socks actually make great companions out on the slopes! They’re warm, quick drying, and are super cushioned and comfortable. Give one pair or a few for an extra special skiing or snowboarding gift!

Darn Tough Yeti Mountain-Themed Socks

What’s better than regular wool socks? Wool socks with mountains on them, duh. Skiers and snowboarders love to show off their love for the mountains, and these Darn Tough Yeti wool socks will surely come in handy on the slopes and for apres-ski.

HotHands Hand/Foot Warmers

When you’re out on the slopes on especially cold days, it’s so easy to get cold in your extremities. That’s why we recommend HotHands hand and foot warmers as one of the best gifts for skiers and snowboarders. They’re inexpensive and are perfect to tuck into gloves or boots for a blast of warmth in otherwise arctic conditions.

Packable Clothesline

You know what happens if ski/snowboard gear doesn’t dry properly? It starts to STINK. Luckily, for ski trips and winter getaways, a packable clothesline is a great tool to hang damp clothes after long days on the slopes. It is a cheap and practical gift for snowboarders and skiers that they’ll use every time they’re at a ski resort.

Snacks for the Slopes

Snacks are a gift that keeps on giving, especially out on the slopes where you’re expending energy and burning calories left and right.

From our own experience, some snacks that skiers and snowboarders like include:

  • Clif bars
  • Kind bars
  • Gu gels (caffeinated and uncaffeinated)
  • Trail mix
  • Jerky (vegan and meat varieties)

Hertel Super Hot Sauce Ski/Snowboard Wax

Once you’re a more advanced skier or snowboarder, you’ll most likely want to wax your gear to optimize your speed on the slopes. Hertel Super Hot Sauce Ski & Snowboard Wax is an all-temperature wax that lasts for three days and doesn’t require an iron (though you can use it that way if you’d like). It’s one of the most useful and budget friendly gifts for skiers and snowboarders that they can use every time they hit the slopes.

The Art of Fear by Kristen Ulmer

There’s nothing better than retreating back to your cabin after a day on the slopes and spending the evening reading a good book…about hitting the slopes! The Art of Fear was written by professional skier Kristen Ulmer about embracing fear and how that applies to snow sports and life in general. This easy, inspiring read is fantastic for those who love snow sports as well as people wanting to understand how to handle fear better.

Fifty Places to Ski and Snowboard Before You Die by Chris Santella

If your loved one is a person who prefers books with photos and gorgeous visuals, Fifty Places to Ski and Snowboard Before You Die by Chris Santella is a fantastic book to leaf through and get inspired. You’ll learn about the most incredible, jaw-dropping, and challenging trails in the entire world, with some stunning photos to boot.

Under an Arctic Sky by Chris Burkard

Chris Burkard’s Under an Arctic Sky is an epic film about surfing under the northern lights. It isn’t exactly about skiing or snowboarding, but it’s a really spectacular story about chasing waves and winter sports in some of Iceland’s most gorgeous landscapes. It’s a great gift to give your winter-loving friends and family…then watch it with them.

Powder Magazine Subscription

What’s more inspiring or entertaining than leafing through an award-winning magazine on your favorite topic? (Answer: nothing.) Powder Magazine is all about skiing and snowboarding, and a subscription is one of the most unique skiing and snowboarding gifts you can give to your favorite winter sports lover.

Useful & Clever Skiing & Snowboarding Gifts

Thermal Buff

For outdoor lovers, there are few things as versatile as a Buff. They advertise that it can be worn in 12+ different ways, and it’s touted as 4 times warmer than microfiber. A thermal Buff is great for skiers and snowboarders to wear under a thick coat, to use as a scarf, or to hold their hair back under their helmets.

PHOOZY Thermal Phone Case

If you’ve ever been out in the cold for an extended amount of time with your phone, you’ll know that the batteries tend to die much more quickly. A PHOOZY Thermal Phone Case can keep your phone warm when you’re not using it, maintaining the battery for longer and ensuring it doesn’t get soaked in the snow.

Hydro Flask Water Bottle

Hydration is a very important part of staying healthy while participating in winter sports, as the action can definitely still dehydrate you. Whether your skier/snowboarder likes their water hot or cold, a Hydro Flask water bottle can keep it that way. Hydro Flask boasts that its bottles keep water cold for 24 hours and hot for 12 hours…definitely enough for a full day out skiing or snowboarding.

Foam Roller

Spending a day (or several) out on the slopes can be fun, but can also cause all kinds of muscle aches and pains. A foam roller is a great tool for stretching and relieving tension after hours of active winter sports, and is one of the best gifts for snowboarders and skiers.

Ski or Snowboard Boots

One of the things that’s most uncomfortable about rental gear is the footwear. You can partially solve this problem for your favorite winter sports lover by purchasing them a pair of their own ski or snowboard boots. Rossignol is a good, durable brand for ski gear, and boots are no exception.

Note: ski boots and snowboard boots are different, so make sure you buy the correct kind for your loved one’s preferences!

Athletico Boot Backpack

Once your beloved skier or snowboarder is more seasoned, they’re going to need a place to put all their awesome gear (like the stuff in this list!). The Athletico Boot Backpack is the perfect all-in-one bag for skiers and snowboarders. There’s space for a helmet, boots, goggles, and extra gear, all in a lightweight and breathable fabric.

Black Diamond Ski Poles

While lots of ski resorts do offer pole rentals, if you’d prefer some that are more lightweight and better customized to your size, these Black Diamond Razor Carbon ski poles are a fantastic companion for skiers anywhere. Unfortunately, these aren’t relevant for snowboarders, but they work well as a gift for mid-level to advanced skiers looking for a gear upgrade!

Technology Gifts for Skiers & Snowboarders

Rechargeable Hand Warmer

While we mentioned some disposable hand warmers earlier in this guide, we’d be remiss if we didn’t offer a zero-waste solution as well. Like we said earlier, keeping extremities warm while out on the slopes is a real challenges for skiers and snowboarders, and a rechargeable hand warmer can be the perfect solution for long days out in the snow.

Waterproof Battery Pack

It gets harder to keep your phone charged the longer you’re out in the cold, so you can probably imagine this being a big challenge for skiers and snowboarders. If you give the gift of a waterproof solar battery pack, however, your skier or snowboarder can recharge while they’re in the sun/snow, and plug in while they’re on the lifts. Pretty nifty, eh?

DryGuy DX Forced Air Boot Dryer

Full disclosure: this is a totally unnecessary item, but a really cool and useful one for skiers and snowboarders, especially if they’re planning to hit the slopes several days in a row or throughout the course of a season. The more someone skis or boards, the more damp their boots end up – this DryGuy DX Boot Dryer ensures that they’re fully dry before the next use.

Garmin Tundra Watch

Like many other athletes, skiers and snowboarders are often obsessed with tracking stats and logging their trails. The Garmin Tundra watch does exactly that and was designed specifically for winter sports, and is one of the more useful gifts for skiers and snowboarders out there.

GoPro Hero Black

A GoPro Hero Black is an excellent gift for the avid skier/snowboarder who wants to document their adventures. Portable, weatherproof, and high-quality, a GoPro will help your favorite winter sports lover capture and relive their favorite moments on the slopes again and again.

Psst…If you decide to get a GoPro as a skiing/snowboarding gift, don’t forget a helmet mount so they can use it hands-free!

Additional Resources


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